Conference Invitation – ‘What’s Good Enough?’

5th National Care Leaver's Day Conference Day(s) : Hour(s) : Minute(s) : Second(s) Following on from last years’ conference “OUT ON MY OWN” we are delighted to announce our upcoming conference on 13th October 2017 in Dublin Castle, sponsored by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs.  “What’s Good Enough?” To celebrate the 5th National Care Leaver’s Day EPIC and Care Leaver’s Ireland are hosting an innovative conference aimed at young people moving towards Aftercare, in Aftercare and Professionals who work with them.  The focus of the conference is “What’s Good Enough?” promoting the positive transition from care to aftercare, highlighting the importance of positive mental health and creative therapeutic interventions,  how  can we improve educational outcomes for care leavers and discuss pathways to accommodation for young people in aftercare. Date: 13th October 2017 Time: 9.30am – 4.30p.m. Venue: The Printworks, Dublin Castle (Map) Price: +16 In Care & Care Leavers Free Professionals €50.00 + Booking Fee Students €25.00 + Booking Fee For tickets please see booking link below: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/whats-good-enough-tickets-36187941106 Download PDF of...
Standardised National Aftercare Allowance

Standardised National Aftercare Allowance

Tusla has introduced a Standardised National Aftercare Allowance for young people who have been in care for 12 months on their 16th birthday or for 12 consecutive months prior to their 18th birthday. The weekly standardised allowance is €300 per week  Information (below) from Tusla 1. How is the Aftercare Allowance determined? Every young person as part of their preparation for leaving care will have an Individual Financial Support Plan. This plan will be completed in advance of the young person turning 18 years of age. The plan takes account of all financial supports available to care leavers and is reviewed as part of aftercare planning. 2. What is an Individual Aftercare Financial Support Plan? An Individual Aftercare Financial Support Plan is an assessment of the financial needs of a young person. It is a standardised tool to assist in identifying all the financial support requirements for each young person. The Individual Financial Support will document all financial supports available to care leavers and financial supports required. It is expected that all care leavers will have access to an income of a minimum allowance of €300 per week. The €300 may be a combined amount from other departments/ agencies or may be paid in full or partly by Tusla. More information: Click here to view the full Guidance Document for the Implementation of the Standardised Aftercare...

Care Questions Answered

Care Questions Answered What is state care? State Care means you are placed in care after a Judge decides that this is in your best interests.  This can happen if that your parents are unable to give you the care you need to keep you safe and protected at home. If you are taken into care you could live in: Foster Care This is living with Foster Parents that care for children and look after you in their home Relative Care This is living with a family member such as a Grandparent, Aunt, Uncle or another member of your family where they will care and look after you in their home. Residential Care This is living in a house with other young people in care and residential care staff. Who is the Child & Family Agency or Tusla? Tusla, also known as the Child and Family Agency was established on the 1st January 2014 and is now the dedicated State agency responsible for improving the wellbeing and outcomes for children. The Child and Family Agency is responsible for providing supports and services to families and protecting children and young people. How can I be taken into care? A decision can be made your parents or by a Judge that it is not safe for you at home and therefore State Care is the best option for you. Voluntary Care: Voluntary care is when your parents agree with The Child and Family Agency (Tusla) that the best option for you is to be taken into care.  In some cases parents are unable to cope due to illness or other problems, and...
Pathways – Guide to Leaving Care

Pathways – Guide to Leaving Care

Download the Guide (PDF) PATHWAYS is an aftercare guide that has been created for young people who are preparing to leave care by young people who have left care. Within this guide there are full and detailed sections telling you everything you need to know for leaving care and assisting you towards finding a place of your own. Those of us who have made this transition before have shared our experience through the consultation in the early stages of preparing this guide. Professionals from the agencies who have for many years worked with care leavers also contributed their experiences gained from supporting young people during this exciting and sometimes scary time. The Pathways aftercare guide has been published jointly by EPIC, Focus Ireland and Empower Ireland - Jan 2013. Download the Guide...
Aftercare

Aftercare

Aftercare life after care and leaving care Get the 'Pathways' Aftercare guide PATHWAYS is an aftercare guide that has been created for young people who are preparing to leave care by young people who have left care. Go What is an Aftercare Plan? An Aftercare Plan  in an individual plan based on a young person’s skills and needs and follows on from their preparation for leaving care plan. It outlines the types of supports available to a young person in aftercare and outline who will support them. Aftercare Plans  work best, and have the most positive results for young people, if they become involved in the planning of the aftercare plan with your social worker, aftercare worker and carers. Small grants for care leavers may be available from Careleavers Ireland What is Aftercare? Aftercare is support provided to young people leaving care who have been assessed as having an aftercare need to ease their transition to independence. Aftercare services can support young people up to 21 years of age, or 23 years of age if in full-time education. While you have the right to aftercare services, it’s your choice to take part, if you choose not to take part in aftercare support to begin with, you can change your mind at any time up until you turn 21 years of age. It’s important to know that aftercare work is done a little differently depending on which Health Service Executive (HSE) area you live in e.g. the age at which your aftercare work begins can vary. If you are unsure about the situation in your area speak to your social worker. Standardised...
Submission to the Joint Committee on Health and Children – Heads of Aftercare Bill 2014

Submission to the Joint Committee on Health and Children – Heads of Aftercare Bill 2014

Key Concerns: Lack of detail concerning needs assessments. Assessment is key to any successful plan, and it is vital that this is not left to Regulations. Absence of implementation process, including timeframe for implementation, accountability for implementation, and review process. Young people leaving care lack skills or support networks for independent living. The most vulnerable young people leaving care are those not in education. Housing Crisis – more accommodation needed in Dublin and weighting system. Aftercare supports should be extended to 25 years, in line with remit of DCYA and National Children and Young People’s Framework. The provision of aftercare is not the sole responsibility of the CFA, and cross departmental coordination is vital. There is no mention of the Leaving and Aftercare Services National Policy and Procedure Document. Consistent language must be used in the Bill and be congruent with the Leaving and Aftercare Services National Policy and Procedure Document. EPIC welcomes the opportunity to respond to the General Scheme and Heads of Aftercare Bill 2014 and this submission is to provide additional information and to accompany the oral presentation to the Joint Oireachtas Committee made by EPIC on the 1st of April 2014 at 5:15pm. Overall, EPIC supports many aspects of this progressive Heads of Aftercare Bill. It provides long overdue legislative footing to the provision of Aftercare, and adds to the many good building blocks that have already been established. EPIC, along with other organisations, and as part of the Action for Aftercare group, has been calling for Aftercare to be provided in legislation for many years.  Any aftercare service must be equitable, consistent, and standardised....

Newstalk Interview

From our archive - Radio interview on Newstalk (2013) About EPIC Advocacy Service and Aftercare and Leaving Care issues, talking to Danielle and Mark about their experiences. (Click below to play) https://www.epiconline.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/newstalk-interview.mp4 Originally Posted by EPIC on Monday, 13 May...
Research on outcomes for young people leaving care in North Dublin

Research on outcomes for young people leaving care in North Dublin

‘My voice has to be heard’ Outcomes_for_young_people_leaving_care_in_North_Dublin_2012 This research study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the issues facing young people when they leave care. This report aims to answer three main research questions. What are the needs and circumstances of young people aged 17-18 who leave care in North Dublin? What factors are associated with more positive outcomes for young people? What are young people’s experiences of receiving aftercare supports? The full report is now available to download as a PDF file (you will need to have a free PDF reader such as Adobe installed). ‘MY VOICE HAS TO BE HEARD’ Research on outcomes for young people leaving care in North Dublin Fiona Daly EPIC Research Officer June 2012 © 2012‘MY VOICE HAS TO BE HEARD’ Research on outcomes for young people leaving care in North Dublin Fiona Daly EPIC Research Officer July...

Briefing Document Aftercare

 Aftercare is a process of preparation and support for leaving care and moving to independent living for all those young people who are or have been in the care of the State. [1]    It is the provision of advice, guidance and assistance with regard to social and emotional support, accommodation and vocational support.  It is a through-care process, in consultation with the young person, beginning from reception into care and includes comprehensive assessments, care plans and reviews.[2] In the absence of a supportive family network, those leaving care experience more acutely the transition to independent living.  An effective aftercare policy strengthens the position of a young person leaving care, supports their transition to independent living and reduces the likelihood of homelessness, and social exclusion on leaving care. [1] There is no standard definition of aftercare. [2] Youth Homelessness Strategy Monitoring Committee ..Read More (full PDF document below) Attachments Briefing Document Aftercare...

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