EPIC Advocacy Cases 2017 Report

This report gives an overview of EPIC Advocacy cases in 2017. It presents a profile of the young people who sought advocacy support, identifies the main presenting issues and key actions taken by EPIC to address their concerns. The aim of EPIC’s advocacy work is to empower children in care and young people with care experience to have a say in issues that affect their lives. The nature of EPIC’s role can vary from providing basic information, for example, in relation to social welfare entitlements, to providing practical support, such as assisting a young person to find an education course or appropriate accommodation. At the highest level of engagement, one of the EPIC Advocacy team may be asked by a young person to represent their views on their behalf, for example, by attending a care or aftercare review meeting. This is the ninth annual report on EPIC Advocacy cases, the first of which was in 2009. The number of Advocacy cases has increased substantially over these eight years – from 61 in 2009 to 589 in 2017. During the year 2017, there were eight Advocacy Officers in EPIC, two in each of the main regions: Dublin North East; Dublin Mid Leinster; South; and West. Therefore, on average, each EPIC Advocacy Officer dealt with 73 cases throughout the year, which has increased from an average of 63 cases in the previous year 2016, when there was a total of 500 EPIC Advocacy cases. In 2017, there were 434 Referrals to the EPIC National Advocacy Service. Compared to the previous year 2016, when there were 370 Referrals, this has increased by...

EPIC Advocacy Policy Document

Advocacy Policy and Practice Guidelines  The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on the implementation and operation of EPIC’s advocacy service: To offer guidance to advocates in their role. To inform service users of what they can realistically expect from their advocate. To inform service providers, other professionals, care staff and foster carers about the scope and limitations of the advocate’s role. To raise awareness of the need for and benefits of independent advocacy  for vulnerable children and young people. To view in full click below https://www.epiconline.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/EPIC-Advocacy-Policy-and-Practice-Document-March-2013.doc                                                ...
Report on EPIC Advocacy Cases 2013

Report on EPIC Advocacy Cases 2013

Full Report> Report on EPIC Advocacy Cases 2013  (PDF) This report gives an overview of the EPIC Advocacy cases in 2013. It presents a profile of the young people who sought advocacy support, identifies the main presenting issues and key actions taken by EPIC to address their concerns. The aim of EPIC’s advocacy work is to empower children in care and young people with care experience to have a say in issues that significantly affect their lives. The nature of EPIC’s role can vary from providing basic information, for example, in relation to social welfare entitlements, to providing practical support, such as assisting a young person to find an education course or appropriate accommodation. At the highest level of engagement, one of the EPIC Advocacy team may be asked by a young person to represent their views on their behalf, for example, by attending a care or aftercare review meeting. This is the fifth annual report on EPIC Advocacy cases, the first of which was in 2009. The number of Advocacy cases has increased substantially over these five years – from 61 in 2009 to 241 in 2013. In October 2012, EPIC employed five additional staff members including a National Advocacy Service Manager and four Advocacy Officers (two for the Dublin Mid-Leinster region and two for the Southern region). This has increased EPIC’s capacity to take on new Advocacy cases, which has certainly contributed to the rise of Advocacy cases. Nevertheless, there has been a real increase in the number of referrals being made to EPIC and an ever increasing demand for advocacy support. The data presented in this report...

Advocacy

Advocacy What is Advocacy?Why would I need an advocate? How will my advocate help me? How do I get an advocate? What is advocacy? Advocacy means supporting you to: Be heard Have a voice Know your rights Take part in the decisions that are being made about your life Find out answers to any questions you may have Understand the complaints system Why would I need an advocate?  If you want some information or advice If you would like help to speak up about an issue that affects you If you would like somebody to attend a meeting with you If you would like help to ask for a service If you need support with any other issues If you want to make a complaint How will my advocate help me?  Firstly, your advocate will listen to you. Then with your permission your advocate might …. Help you write  a letter Speak to somebody on your behalf Attend a meeting with you Help you to make a complaint Support you to speak up about decisions in your life Find out information Help you to understand what is being said How do I get an advocate? Firstly, it is your decision if you want an advocate to work with you. You (or somebody else on your behalf can contact the EPIC office by phone, text, email or letter) The Advocacy Manager or Advocate will then contact you to see how they can help you. Top Advocacy Issues presented to EPIC Care placement 33% 33% Care or aftercare plan 17% 17% Family Contact 14% 14% Education 13% 13% Accommodation 12% 12%...
Report on EPIC Advocacy Cases 2012

Report on EPIC Advocacy Cases 2012

Full Report> Report on EPIC Advocacy Cases 2012 This report presents detailed information on the characteristics of young people who engaged with EPIC’s Advocacy Service in 2012. 2012 has witnessed a levelling-off of advocacy cases where there were 123 advocacy cases on a par to 2011. However, as identified in this report, the duration of advocacy cases has increased for example, 22% of advocacy cases lasted for over six months in 2012 compared to just 9% in 2011. In late October 2012, EPIC employed 5 additional staff members including: 1 National Advocacy Service Manager, 2 new Advocacy Officers for the HSE Dublin Mid-Leinster region and 2 new Advocacy Officers for the HSE South region. During this period (late October-December 2012), there were 29 referrals recorded. The aim of EPIC’s advocacy work is to empower children and care leavers to have a say and be heard in issues that significantly affect their lives. The nature of the Advocacy role can comprise varying levels of involvement by EPIC. At the most basic level, it may involve finding out information requested by the young person, for example, in relation to welfare rights, housing rights or regarding aftercare options available. A young person may also contact EPIC looking for practical or emotional support, for example, a young adult may need assistance in finding suitable accommodation. At the highest level of engagement, one of the EPIC Advocacy team may be required to advocate, or represent the young person’s views with them or on their behalf, for example, by attending a care/ aftercare review meeting or a court hearing. The data in this report focuses on...

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