National Review Panel Report in to Foster Care abuse case in Galway raises very serious concerns

According to a report from RTE, TUSLA, the Child and Family Agency, will today publish a report by the National Review Panel into a series of failings that occurred in a foster home in county Galway. The Review Panel was delayed in publishing its report until the outcome of a criminal prosecution. The report highlights a number of serious failings and systemic flaws in the management of the case by both the HSE and TUSLA. Terry Dignan, CEO of EPIC, said: “The report raises very serious questions about how this case was managed and how the failings identified will be addressed in the management of similar cases in the future. Underlying at least some of the failings highlighted in the report appears to be the lack of sufficient staff resources to ensure that there was a comprehensive initial assessment of the family, the development of comprehensive risk assessments and safety plans and a regular review and re-assessment of these plans. The serious errors of judgment, flawed assessment and poor decision-making highlighted in the case-management of these children also raises questions about the training and experience of at least some of the staff involved. This in turn appears to have been compounded by the lack of management oversight identified in the report. Ultimately the failure to protect vulnerable young children and the circumstances of this case is completely unacceptable. The reality is that, due to inadequate resourcing, there are many more children in the care system who do not have regular access to a social worker and as a result, are potentially at risk. The recruitment and, more importantly, the...

Research

Research What is research? Research involves collecting and analysing data to answer a particular question. For example, EPIC has done research on young people’s experiences of taking part in their Child in Care Reviews (published in 2014). Research can be done in many different ways, for example, by using surveys, carrying out interviews or doing a focus group. These are examples of primary research, where the information is collected from research participants. Secondary sources of data can also be used – this means information that already exists, for example, official statistics, published literature reviews and other research studies. EPIC carries out both primary and secondary research to provide a better understanding of the important issues facing children and young people in care or young adults with care experience. EPIC is also involved in research being done by other organisations in relation to children and young people in care, for example, the Children’s Mental Health Coalition. Doing research usually involves most of the following steps: Ethical Principles There are important ethical principles to take into account when doing primary research, in particular: Voluntary informed consent – make sure that research participants know what is involved in taking part and agree voluntarily to do so Confidentiality and anonymity – all the data should be confidential and nobody who took part should be identified (except where someone says something that raises concerns about their safety or that of someone else). Doing no harm – ensure that taking part in the research will not have negative results for participants both during and after they take part. Respectful and non-judgemental – listen to what...
Research on outcomes for young people leaving care in North Dublin

Research on outcomes for young people leaving care in North Dublin

‘My voice has to be heard’ Outcomes_for_young_people_leaving_care_in_North_Dublin_2012 This research study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the issues facing young people when they leave care. This report aims to answer three main research questions. What are the needs and circumstances of young people aged 17-18 who leave care in North Dublin? What factors are associated with more positive outcomes for young people? What are young people’s experiences of receiving aftercare supports? The full report is now available to download as a PDF file (you will need to have a free PDF reader such as Adobe installed). ‘MY VOICE HAS TO BE HEARD’ Research on outcomes for young people leaving care in North Dublin Fiona Daly EPIC Research Officer June 2012 © 2012‘MY VOICE HAS TO BE HEARD’ Research on outcomes for young people leaving care in North Dublin Fiona Daly EPIC Research Officer July...
Call Now Button
Positive SSL